Introducing a new partner to your child

Learn about: Introducing a new partner to your child from Alan Yellin, PhD,...
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Introducing a new partner to your child

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There is a lot of variation with regard to professionals telling parents when to introduce a significant other. We are pretty much in agreement that you should not be introducing children to dates, that is parents do date but we don´t want children to attach to someone that the parent is not certain is going to remain in that parent´s life. So generally, to be most conservative, I usually tell parents the time to introduce a significant other is when you are pretty certain that you are going to move on the path towards engagement or you are engaged. Then when that happens, we want to start off rather slowly where they meet, there is no demonstration of affection. The child meets that other person for a shorter time and then over time increases the frequency and the length of time they spend with that significant other.

Learn about: Introducing a new partner to your child from Alan Yellin, PhD,...

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Alan Yellin, PhD

Psychologist

Dr. Alan Yellin is a licensed psychologist as well as licensed marriage and family therapist.  He has been in practice for over 30 years working with children, adolescents and adults. Dr. Yellin did his post-doctoral fellowship at Children’s Hospital in Los Angeles. In his practice, he sees children with learning problems, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, fears and social skills issues. Additionally, he has a sub-specialty in working with children from divorced families as well as helping parents deal more effectively with their divorce. Dr. Yellin’s practice also includes working with adolescents and adults with depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive issues as well as issues around life passages. Dr. Yellin believes that therapy works best when the client and therapist have a collaborative relationship as they explore thoughts and feelings and work towards solutions, and uses a combination of scientific data along with humor to help people achieve change. He is in a long-term happy marriage and has two grown children.

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