How alcohol and drugs affect a baby's ability to attach

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How alcohol and drugs affect a baby's ability to attach

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If a pregnant woman has been drinking during pregnancy and alcohol seems to be the most serious offender, in terms of causing brain damage, the baby's brain will probably be changed permanently. Nobody knows quite how much alcohol exposure produces fetal alcohol syndrome or alcohol related neurodevelopmental disorder, however we know that alcohol exposure does produce permanent long term damage. And the thing's most interfered with early on in the development is the child's capacity to trust and connect with the birth-mother or whoever the caregiver's, after they're given to her, because the brain has not matured as it should have and so, when the child was born after having exposure to alcohol, they are not prepared to do what a typically developing brain would have a baby do, which is to be born, seek the food source, establish eye contact with a mother and accept nurturing and cuddling, so that alcohol damage is very serious, but families can help many of these children, but the overall damage is permanent, though there are many things parents can do to help the child learn, develop cause and effect thinking and finally settling to, the least being someone able to function in a more independent way as they mature.

Watch Video: How alcohol and drugs affect a baby's ability to attach by Gregory Keck, PhD, ...

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Gregory Keck, PhD

Founder & Director, Attachment & Bonding Center of Ohio

Gregory C. Keck, Ph.D., is the founder and director of the Attachment & Bonding Center of Ohio. He is an internationally known psychologist and trainer who addresses the issues of trauma, adoption, and post-adoption challenges. He and his staff provide attachment therapy for adoptive families whose children have experienced serious early childhood maltreatment prior to adoption. In 2012, he received the National Association of Social Workers State of Ohio Lifetime Achievement Award. He is the parent of two sons who were adopted in adolescence.

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