Why boys don't do homework

Kelley King, Educational Consultant & Author, shares advice for parents on the reasons why boys generally don't do homework, and why boys and girls who are just as smart get uneven grades
Raising Boys | Why Boys Don't Like Doing Homework
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Why boys don't do homework

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Boys tend to fall behind in homework, even though their test scores are comparable, because they are less likely to be organized. They are less likely to do homework. In fact, homework completion, and actually turning it in, is one of the biggest causes in what we call the gender gap, in terms of the kids' GPA. Girls are 70 percent of the A's and boys are in 70 percent of the D's and F's. All of that can be narrowed down into homework completion, not doing what they need to do in class. Boys are less inclined to want to do it to please the teacher. If a boy doesn't see relevancy in it, don't see why this matters to them, why they should have to do it, if the task is somewhat menial perhaps. If they find it really annoying to do, like if there's 70 problems to do instead of maybe 25; and it gets to be too much busy work, boys are more likely to say, "You know what? This is dumb. I'm not doing it." Girls are more likely to do it. When they turn it in, they get the better grades. Boys and girls can be equally as smart, but have very different outcomes in terms of their grades.

Kelley King, Educational Consultant & Author, shares advice for parents on the reasons why boys generally don't do homework, and why boys and girls who are just as smart get uneven grades

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Kelley King

Educational Consultant & Author

Kelley King has been a K-12 public school educator for over 25 years with work in the areas of school administration, gifted education and special education. Kelley is currently the Associate Director of the Gurian Institute and provides on-site and online workshops for parents and teachers internationally. Kelley is a co-author, with Michael Gurian and Kathy Stevens, of two books on education: Strategies for Teachings Boys and Girls: A Workbook for Elementary Educators and Strategies for Teaching Boys and Girls: A Workbook for Secondary Educators. Kelley finished her third book entitled Writing the Playbook, a guide for principals on creating schools that honor the unique strengths and characteristics of boys. Kelley is the mother of an 18-year-old son and a 16-year-old daughter.

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