Differences between adult and child therapy

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Differences between adult and child therapy

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How is child therapy different from adult therapy? Everybody knows the classic image we all have of adult therapy where a client is lying on a couch talking about their past while a silent therapist sits behind them taking notes. That doesn´t work with kids, and for two big reasons. One is that kids get really bored sitting still and talking about themself really fast. But secondly, they don´t have much of a past. They are living that past right now. The way that you get this with child therapy is through the language of play. Children express brillantly what they are living through through toys, games, activities, art, acting, any of these things. This is the way kids grow. And to parents, it will often sound silly and look ridiculous because they will say what are you doing. But the fact is that a kid will grow more through the trauma of a divorce or their dog dying or anything like this through sitting with a good therapist and playing a game, drawing a picture, heaving water balloons than being asked to talk about their feelings. And the cool part is unlike with a dentist or an MD, kids will actually want to come back.

Watch Video: Differences between adult and child therapy by Douglas Green, MFT, ...

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Douglas Green, MFT

Child Therapist

Douglas Green left a successful career as a writer and director of film, stage and television to become a Psychotherapist, specializing in helping children and teenagers live lives they can be proud of.  He has a degree in Drama Therapy, and uses creative active techniques often in his work.  He has extensive experience in working with numerous childhood issues, such as ADHD, autism, Asperger's, depression, anxiety, and recovery from physical, sexual, and emotional Abuse.  He works at two offices, one in Woodland Hills, CA and one in West Los Angeles, CA, and is an Adjunct Professor at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

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