Inhalants

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Inhalants

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Inhalants, including whippets and any other kind petroleum-based product, are something that is typical in two different groups of people. Very, very young kids who don't know about it and who don't have access to other drugs and people who are very, very poor such as in a rural area or Indian reservation where they may, again, not have access to other drugs, they tend not to be a preferred substance that they have alternatives. Most people will use something else. A whippet is just a form of an inhalant that you crack open and can use. Kind of a nice thing because you often whip it in order to crack it open. When you use inhalants, it literally immediately damages your brain. That damage is permanent. And, prolonged use of inhalants, over a period of a year or two, can lead to permanent brain damage that may be debilitating for the rest of your life and may leave you functionally retarded. So, it's a very serious thing. Most people who try inhalants stopp, or if they continue to use them, they become so functionally impaired that they're out of society.

View Michael Dennis, PhD's video on Inhalants...

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Michael Dennis, PhD

Psychologist

Michael Dennis, PhD, is a senior research psychologist and Director of the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) coordinating center at Chestnut Health Systems in Normal, Illinois. Over the past 25 years his primary area of research has been to better understand and manage addiction and recovery over the life course. This includes multiple clinical trials to compare the effectiveness of adolescent treatment approaches and recovery support services, longitudinal studies with adolescents, adults and older adults to understand the predictors of entering and sustaining recovery, and creating the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) coordinating center for teaching evidenced based assessment to support clinical decision making at the individual level and program evaluation. He has multiple awards for moving the field from science to practice, promoting diversity through practice based evidence and bringing more people into the field.

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