Risks and prevalence of amphetamines and meth amphetamines

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Risks and prevalence of amphetamines and meth amphetamines

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Stimulants, amphetamines, and methamphetamines have, sort of, come and gone over the past several years. Twenty or thirty years ago, people would take them as diet pills. Doctors would give you a big bottle of them and call them pep pills. They were given to soldiers. Over time, we realize that it causes a variety of hypertension and other problems, so the medical community has backed away from the use as much; with the exception of treating ADHD and a few other places where there is a medical reason behind it. Amphetamines, which are stimulants that are generally a smoother, short acting, small thing. Methamphetamines are much stronger. It is like a crack high that lasts for 6 to 8 hours. That person is on a run that person cannot stop. During that time, they are running around, often out of touch with reality. They may be hallucinating or having psychotic breaks. They may show up in a jail, a prison, or a drug bust. They are often out of touch with reality. They are very, very powerful drugs that may leave you out of touch with reality for a long time. They are not evenly spread throughout the United States. You tend to see methamphetamine particularly around communities that are farming communities or fishing communities, where there is not a lot of police activity. In order to make the work of selling amphetamine, you often have to steal the ingredients. You have to cook it. When you cook methamphetamine in an illegal lab, most of the time those labs end up blowing up. There are in disposable places. They are along coastlines or in rural areas where there is less police presence because it is relatively easy to spot a meth lab.

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Michael Dennis, PhD

Psychologist

Michael Dennis, PhD, is a senior research psychologist and Director of the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) coordinating center at Chestnut Health Systems in Normal, Illinois. Over the past 25 years his primary area of research has been to better understand and manage addiction and recovery over the life course. This includes multiple clinical trials to compare the effectiveness of adolescent treatment approaches and recovery support services, longitudinal studies with adolescents, adults and older adults to understand the predictors of entering and sustaining recovery, and creating the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) coordinating center for teaching evidenced based assessment to support clinical decision making at the individual level and program evaluation. He has multiple awards for moving the field from science to practice, promoting diversity through practice based evidence and bringing more people into the field.

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